Status of the project

ESCAPE lasts three years, from autumn 2016 to autumn 2019. During its lifetime, the project encounters seven milestones, highlighted in blue in the following figure. Intermediate project achievements between milestones are reported as yellow elements.

http://www.gnss-escape.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ESCAPE_Timeline_v2.jpg

 

Preliminary Algorithm Architecture

On April 2017 the preliminary structure of the algorithms governing the ESCAPE Engine has been released.
The ESCAPE GNSS Engine, also indicated as EGE, is the innovative system developed as part of the ESCAPE project to provide pose estimates with an integrity layer, tailored to Renault’s autonomous driving vehicle.

http://www.gnss-escape.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ESCAPE_Engine_v3.jpg

 The preliminary algorithm structure, represented in the figure above, has defined:

  • the functional elements that make the core EGE algorithms;
  • how these algorithms interact with other external elements;
  • the content of the data flows exchanged between them;
  • the traceability of the user requirements onto the EGE elements.

In parallel, also the safety analysis of the algorithms has been elaborated, as these are critical components for the intelligent vehicles.

The preliminary algorithm architecture is the first of three intermediate steps bringing the project to the Preliminary Design Review; the incoming ones are:

  • the preliminary hardware architecture, and
  • the preliminary software architecture.

 

User Requirements Review

At the User Requirement Review (URR), completed in February 2017, the project has concluded two fundamental tasks:

  • the identification of the user-level requirements, and
  • the user-level safety analysis.

Their importance is in the fact that a major element that influences the design of the positioning engine is  the level of automation expected from the vehicle.  To translate this concept in an effective approach, the user-level expectations have been mapped in five major use cases, for which several test paths
have been identified where algorithms and functionalities will be
tested.  This approach guarantees that the design proceeds under an
effective user needs-driven perspective, so as to end up with a close to market architecture that enables road vehicle automation.

 

Kick-Off Meeting

On November 10th, 2016, the ESCAPE project kicked-off in Prague, Czech Republic, in the European GNSS Agency premises.

The future of the autonomous driving is “made-in-Europe”! European Safety Critical Applications Positioning Engine – ESCAPE project has kicked-off at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) premises in Prague. ESCAPE is a three-year and 5.4 M€ project aiming to exploit the services offered by Galileo, the European satellite navigation system, in the field of the automated driving. ESCAPE will coordinate some of the most relevant industrial and research institutions in Europe to create a positioning engine for safety-critical applications on the road, namely- the applications involving highly automated driving. All the members of the ESCAPE’s consortium participated to the KO meeting, collaborating to the successful launch of the project.

 

Status of the project

ESCAPE will last three years, from autumn 2016 to autumn 2019. During its lifetime, the project will encounter some major milestones, summarized in the following figure.

Kick-Off Meeting

On November 10th, 2016, the ESCAPE project kicked-off in Prague, Czech Republic, in the European GNSS Agency premises.

The future of the autonomous driving is “made-in-Europe”! European Safety Critical Applications Positioning Engine – ESCAPE project has kicked-off at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) premises in Prague. ESCAPE is a three-year and 5.4 M€ project aiming to exploit the services offered by Galileo, the European satellite navigation system, in the field of the automated driving. ESCAPE will coordinate some of the most relevant industrial and research institutions in Europe to create a positioning engine for safety-critical applications on the road, namely- the applications involving highly automated driving. All the members of the ESCAPE’s consortium participated to the KO meeting, collaborating to the successful launch of the project.

 

User Requirements Review

At the User Requirement Review (URR), completed in February 2017, the project has concluded two fundamental tasks:

  • the identification of the user-level requirements, and
  • the user-level safety analysis.

Their importance is in the fact that a major element that influences the design of the positioning engine is  the level of automation expected from the vehicle.  To translate this concept in an effective approach, the user-level expectations have been mapped in five major use cases, for which several test paths have been identified where algorithms and functionalities will be tested.  This approach guarantees that the design proceeds under an effective user needs-driven perspective, so as to end up with a close to market architecture that enables road vehicle automation.

The ESCAPE Project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the European Union’s Fundamental Elements research and development programme under grant agreement No.GSA/GRANT/01/2015

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